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The latest news from Business Insider

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    daryl dixon walking dead

    • It's no secret that Daryl hasn't spoken much on "The Walking Dead" during the past few seasons. 
    • One fan mapped out how much Daryl has spoken — or hasn't spoken — on the show since its start.
    • A simple chart by Reddit user Da1tontheGreat shows Daryl barely spoke on season seven and didn't speak much during seasons five and six, either.
    • "The Walking Dead" star Norman Reedus has also addressed his character's lack of dialogue on the show. He said former showrunner Scott Gimple told him, "Don't worry, you'll talk again one day."

    Fans have said that Daryl hasn't spoken much on "The Walking Dead" for years now, and we finally have proof to back it up. 

    One hero fan went through the series' first eight seasons and painstakingly tracked how many words Daryl (Norman Reedus) spoke on the show each year.  Reddit user Da1tonTheGreatshared a simple chart mapping out the number of words Reedus spoke on the show's subreddit.

    It's eye opening.

    how much daryl dixon spoke on the walking dead

    You can view it here

    The chart shows a drastic drop in dialogue for Daryl during seasons five, six, and seven while Scott M. Gimple was the series' showrunner. Daryl spoke the most lines during season four, also while Gimple was in command, and had significantly more lines early on during the show's first few seasons. 

    What was going on during season seven? 

    Daryl was imprisoned and tortured for a good portion of season seven by Negan and his Saviors. Negan tried breaking Daryl to try and make him one of his own. Daryl felt a lot of personal grief after taking responsibility for the death of close friend Glenn at Negan's hands.

    daryl the walking dead

    Now that a year and a half has passed since the end of the war with Negan, Daryl is speaking again a lot. "The Walking Dead" also has a new showrunner in the series' longtime writer Angela Kang. Fans immediately noticed the difference in how much Daryl has been speaking during the show's latest season. 

    Reedus is aware of the change, too, and addressed it recently on "Walking Dead" aftershow, "Talking Dead."

    "The last couple of seasons I didn't say much, that's true," said Reedus after the series' season nine premiere. "It's always been story first. And [former showrunner] Scott [M. Gimple] was always story first. He would tell me, 'Don't worry, you'll talk again one day.'"

    Well, Daryl's speaking and we don't plan to see him stopping soon with Andrew Lincoln departing the series as Rick Grimes this season

    You can follow along with our "Walking Dead" coverage here

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 3 compelling reasons why we haven't found aliens yet


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    jamal khashoggi cat

    • The fiancée of Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist and prominent Saudi critic who died inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, wrote a touching tribute to him on Twitter.
    • "They took your bodily presence from my world. But your beautiful laugh will remain in my soul forever," Hatice Cengiz tweeted Saturday evening, along with a video showing Khashoggi laughing during a TV interview.
    • Cengiz, who is a Turkish national, last saw her fiancé after he entered into the consulate on October 2 to retrieve documents for their upcoming wedding. She says he never exited the building. 
    • She has been put under 24-hour police protection, Turkish state media said, hours after Saudi Arabia admitted that Khashoggi had died inside its embassy.

    The fiancée of Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist and prominent Saudi critic who died inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, wrote a touching tribute to him on Twitter.

    "They took your bodily presence from my world. But your beautiful laugh will remain in my soul forever. My darling #jkhashoggi," Hatice Cengiz tweeted Saturday evening.

    Cengiz attached a video of Khashoggi during an interview for a TV documentary. During filming, a cat jumped onto Khashoggi's lap, causing the journalist to erupt into laughter. 

    "You should leave this in the film," he tells the camera. 

    Cengiz, who is a Turkish national, last saw her fiancé after he entered into the consulate on October 2 to retrieve documents for their upcoming wedding. 

    Cengiz says she waited for Khashoggi outside the consulate for roughly 11 hours but he never came out. She was told to call Turan Kislakci, the head of the Turkish Arab Media Association, in the event he did not exit the embassy, CNN reported

    Cengiz has been active on Twitter and has repeatedly called on world leaders to wrap up their investigations and disclose details on Khashoggi's whereabouts.

    Cengiz has been put under 24-hour police protection, according to Turkish state news agency Anadolu

    jamal khashoggi fiance hatice

    The order was made by Istanbul's governor's office, but didn't specify what prompted the decision to increase her security detail. 

    Saudi Arabia acknowledged on Saturday that Khashoggi had died inside their Turkish consulate, but claimed that the 59-year-old was killed in a "fistfight" that escalated. Saudi Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubeir on Sunday denied that the nation's powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was behind the journalist's death, and reiterated claims that a "rogue operation" was responsible.

    But officials are skeptical of Saudi's explanation for the Khashoggi's death. Turkish officials have repeatedly touted claims that Khashoggi was brutally tortured and dismembered by what appeared to be a 15-person kill squad flown in from Saudi Arabia. 

    US President Donald Trump said Saturday he wasn't satisfied with Saudi Arabia's latest response, but said canceling a $110 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia would hurt the US "far more than it hurts them."

    "Obviously there's been deception, and there's been lies," he told said during an interview with the Washington Post on Saturday. US officials have repeatedly called for Trump to order an investigation and trigger possible Magnitsky sanctions against those involved in Khashoggi's disappearance.

    For now, the US, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey are continuing their investigation into the incident before Trump or the US Senate decide to retaliate.

    SEE ALSO: Saudi foreign minister denies the crown prince had anything to do with Khashoggi's death as Trump says 'there's been lies' in Saudi Arabia's explanations

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Bob Muglia Snowflake Computing

    • When Snowflake Computing CEO Bob Muglia joined the company in 2014, it had yet to bring in any revenue; today, it's a $3.5 billion firm.
    • Muglia says the company's success can be attributed largely to its founding ideals: Put customers first, and value integrity.
    • Now the company is considering going public in 2020.

    When Bob Muglia joined enterprise-technology company Snowflake Computing in 2014, the company was a small, 30-person startup that had yet to bring in its first dollar of revenue.

    Four years later, Muglia, who became the company's CEO after working nearly two decades at Microsoft, has helped build Snowflake Computing into a multibillion-dollar enterprise with 650 employees and customers like Netflix, Adobe, and DoorDash.

    Just last week, the company, which offers a cloud-based database to store software information, announced the closing of a $450 million funding round from investors including Sequoia Capital, Altimeter Capital, and Capital One. Its new valuation? $3.5 billion.

    In an interview with Business Insider, Muglia said that Snowflake's success isn't what he would describe as a turnaround story.

    "We've always been consistent," he said. "Since the very first day Snowflake was founded, we've been able to ride up a straight line."

    The company's steady progression can be attributed largely to its underlying values, which Muglia said were instituted in a collaborative process early on.

    "Our values come from our people, not from our founders," he said. "Really, they come from all of us."

    In the company's first years, Muglia and Snowflake's founding team encouraged employees to contribute to an ongoing discussion regarding what they believed should be the company's core values.

    After much deliberation, Snowflake settled on its primary beliefs: Put customers first, and value integrity.

    "Our values are really straightforward," said Muglia. "Companies that have been around for a long time and understand the importance of putting the customer first are building on a solid foundation."

    Instituting these values hasn't always been easy

    Muglia recalled a moment in recent memory when Snowflake's founding values clashed with its short-term profits. There'd been a error in the company's installment process for a client, and it wasn't clear who's fault it was. Over the course of several months, the error had racked up a growing sum of incremental costs, which now amounted to $350,000.

    "There was a big debate over what we should do about that," said Muglia. "Ultimately, we absorbed the costs. We decided to put the customer first. It builds goodwill. Now, this customer is talking about this experience and how Snowflake resolved it."

    While not everyone at Snowflake agreed with how the company handled the situation, Muglia said that any disagreements were resolved by referring to the company's fundamental value: put customers first.

    In moments like these, Muglia said that it helps to think big picture and have a set of values to fall back on.

    "In the end, that customer has the potential to be much a bigger benefit when you absolve these sort of costs short term," he said.

    It's the steady adherence to these values that's paved the way for Snowflake's exponential growth, Muglia said.

    "But this is only the beginning," said Muglia, who added that the company is considering going public in 2020. "We've had incredible, successful customers, and we're only just starting out."

    SEE ALSO: Walmart looked at buying buzzy luggage brand Away — and it could be part of its plan to become the Netflix of retail

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Watch Apple unveil a new, bigger watch


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    Walmart green environment product marketing 2.JPG

    • Walmart's VP of health and wellness transformation said the retailer will be making more aggressive strides into healthcare.
    • Marcus Osborne highlighted a few key projects that have been successful, including the self-service health kiosks that it has installed in stores and free health assessments. 
    • Osborne said that retailers have to evolve to cater to what consumers need, or risk going bankrupt like Sears.

    Walmart is gearing up to play a more active role in healthcare. 

    The biggest U.S. retailer has been testing a number of approaches for both its workers and customers, and is preparing to play a more "aggressive'' role, Marcus Osborne, Walmart's vice president of health and wellness transformation, said at the Financial Times Digital Health Summit on Wednesday.

    "There's a need to create a real, true front door for healthcare that hasn't existed," said Osborne. "And to put that door where people are and use technology in an appropriate way, that's what we're trying to do."

    An increasing number of retailers are rethinking their approaches to healthcare as they grapple with changing shopping habits. CVS Health has touted the benefits of delivering more care in its stores as a big reason for its $69 billion acquisition of insurer Aetna. Walgreens is putting telemedicine kiosks in some locations.

    Walmart has been experimenting with healthcare for years, and Osborne highlighted some successes, such as the retailer's wellness events and the health check-up kiosks the retailer has in thousands of stores. The kiosks have been particularly popular with middle-aged white men who wouldn't otherwise see a doctor, he said.

    The company also has medical clinics in a handful of stores and recently opened a dentist's office in one. Osborne said the dental office was a hit, and that during dental services, blood pressure and weight can also be checked to give consumers more "bang for your buck."

    "The olden days, they had big palaces of healthcare they built, hoping people show up, or fail," Osborne said. "Trying to address the need where people are and doing it in a way where you don't ask them to have to come out of their lives is the challenge."

    Osborne said that in the next 5 to 10 years, retail is going to transform because consumers' demands are changing. Retailers are also facing a big challenge from Amazon, which is drawing shoppers away from stores by offering convenience and low prices, and is getting into healthcare as well. He said retailers like Walmart are working to adapt to avoid the fate of Sears, which filed for bankruptcy this week.

    "We all want to exist in 10 years," Osborne said. "None of us wants to be Sears." 

    SEE ALSO: From health clinics at Whole Foods to Alexa for home care, here's how Amazon could dominate healthcare

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Ray Dalio says the economy looks like 1937 and a downturn is coming in about two years


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    maggie walking dead

    Warning: There are spoilers ahead for Sunday's episode of "The Walking Dead,""Warning Signs."

    The mystery of the missing Saviors may have come to an end on Sunday's episode of "The Walking Dead," but a larger war may be brewing up underneath the surface between Rick and Maggie. The two have very different ways of dealing with problems in their respective communities. 

    Plus, Father Gabriel looks like he's going to get whisked away by Anne on that mystery helicopter. From the Oceanside men to another look at Hershel's watch, there were a lot of  nods to previous seasons this week. Keep reading to see what you may have missed.

    Sunday's opening of "The Walking Dead" teases a threatening sign, "Final Warning."

    As Justin reanimates into one of the undead, pay attention to the screen and you'll notice the ominous message. After watching the episode, it seems to be a message to the Saviors from the Oceanside women. There were also some thoughts this may be a message from upcoming villains, The Whisperers. 

    If you've been watching the season closely, this isn't the first time we've seen this message. 



    You can see the same message very briefly on the show's new opening credits.

    Showrunner Angela Kang said there are a lot of callbacks and Easter eggs waiting to be found in the new opening. Not all of them are nods to past events on the show like Carl and Glenn's death. 

    The noose hanging from the barn and the words "Final Warning" all hinted at moments to come on season nine. 

    It's also worth noting that we've seen writing on walls like this before on the show. During season five when the group went back to Noah's community, a warning sign could briefly be seen behind Michonne saying, "Wolves Not Far." That sign teased the eventual introduction of a gruesome group who referred to themselves as the Wolves, who attacked Alexandria. 



    Rick heads down the stairs at the episode’s start and touches a panel with two handprints.

    Did your eyes tear up as you realized Rick took the old deck from his house at Alexandria with his children's handprints and hung it up on a wall?

    Carl spent his good last day making sure that he spent some time with his little sister before saying goodbye to Michonne and Rick. 

    The entire scene with Rick is even more emotional when you think about how he was going from room to room checking in on all of his loved ones before he began the day. Carl was the last one he passed before starting his day.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    migrant caravan

    • The migrant caravan that trekked through the Northern Triangle and reached Mexico this weekend has swelled to an estimated 7,000 people, and is largely heading to the United States.
    • President Donald Trump has raged against the caravan, pinning blame in turn on Central American governments, US asylum laws, and congressional Democrats.
    • Despite Mexico's efforts to process the migrants as refugees and halt their travel, many crossed the Guatemala-Mexico border over the weekend illegally, and decided to continue northward.

    The ever-growing caravan of Central American migrants swelled on Sunday to an estimated 7,000 people, who are largely dedicated to traveling north in the hopes of reaching the United States.

    The caravan first set out from Honduras on October 13 as a group of 160 migrants, but grew to a massive group after word spread. The migrants have told media outlets they're fleeing their home countries due to crippling poverty and widespread violence.

    On Sunday they trekked through Mexico, chanting, "Si se pudo," Spanish for, "Yes, we could!"

    migrant caravan

    President Donald Trump has raged against the governments of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, whom he accused of not doing enough to stop the mass exodus of Central Americans.

    Trump has threatened to cut aid to those countries if the caravan makes it to the US border, though he praised the Mexican government for deploying federal police officers to manage the situation.

    "Full efforts are being made to stop the onslaught of illegal aliens from crossing our Southern Border. People have to apply for asylum in Mexico first, and if they fail to do that, the U.S. will turn them away. The courts are asking the U.S. to do things that are not doable!" he tweeted Sunday. "The Caravans are a disgrace to the Democratic Party. Change the immigration laws NOW!"

    'If they stop us now, we'll just come back a second time'

    migrant caravan

    Though Mexico has tried to prevent the migrants from crossing illegally, and ordered them to request asylum from immigration officials at the border crossings, only several hundred did, according to NPR. Roughly 1,500 of the caravan members remained on the Guatemalan side of the Mexican border.

    Thousands of others entered Mexico illegally, crossing the Suchiate River, between Guatemala and Mexico, by swimming or taking rafts. A number of the migrants voted by a show of hands on Saturday, once they reached Mexico, to continue heading north, The New York Times reported.

    "We want to get to the United States," one 17-year-old Honduran, Maria Irias Rodriguez, told The Times. She said she was traveling with her two young children and husband. "If they stop us now, we'll just come back a second time."

    migrant caravan

    The growing caravan and seeming inability to stop it highlights a number of complex issues at play: The labyrinthine US asylum system, which the Trump administration loathes for its protections against detaining and quickly deporting children; the gargantuan task of securing a 2,000-mile border with Mexico; and the often desperate circumstances in the countries that prompt people to flee, which US government officials recently visited Guatemala to address.

    Meanwhile, Mexico's president-elect, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, said Sunday that the US, Canada, and Mexico should strike a deal to invest in Central American development, according to the Associated Press.

    "He who leaves his town does not leave for pleasure but out of necessity," he said.

    Lopez Obrador, who takes office December 1, ran on a pro-immigration platform, promising jobs and work visas in Mexico to Central American migrants.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan makes a speech during a ceremony marking the second anniversary of the attempted coup at the Presidential Palace in Ankara, Turkey, July 15, 2018.

    • Turkish President RecepTayyip Erdogan promised to reveal the "naked truth" regarding journalist Jamal Khashoggi's death on Tuesday. 
    • "We are looking for justice here and this will be revealed in all its naked truth, not through some ordinary steps but in all its naked truth," Erdogan added.
    • Several members of Erdogan's ruling AK Party also vowed not to "allow a cover-up" of what really happened to Khashoggi inside the Istanbul consulate during his final moments.
    • Erdogan's statement comes after Saudi Arabia officially admitted that Khashoggi died inside their consulate, claiming that he got into a "fistfight" which turned deadly. 

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan promised to reveal the "naked truth" about the events leading up to journalist Jamal Khashoggi's death on Tuesday. 

    "I will make my statement about this issue on Tuesday at the party group meeting," Erdogan said during a speech in Istanbul.

    "We are looking for justice here and this will be revealed in all its naked truth, not through some ordinary steps but in all its naked truth".

    On Saturday, Saudi Arabia confirmed that the 59-year-old Saudi dissident died inside their consulate. They claimed Khashoggi died after a "fistfight" escalated, and fired 5 top officials and arrested 18 Saudis.

    On Sunday, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubeir reiterated the claims, and denied Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had any prior knowledge of what happened inside the Istanbul consulate on October 2. 

    Turkish officials are conducting their own investigation, and believe Khashoggi was brutally murdered and dismembered, possibly by a 15-person hit squad sent in to confront him at the consulate. Video and audio evidence purported to be from the day of Khashoggi's disappearance reportedly back up these claims

    Erdogan has largely remained silent on the matter, though he noted several inconsistencies in Saudi Arabia's version of the incident.

    "Why 15 people came ... why 18 people were detained ... These things have to be told in detail," Erdogan said.

    According to Al Jazeera, Erdogan's comments mark the first time a senior official has given an official end date to the ongoing investigations, which has seen conflicting narratives emerge from all sides. 

    Several members of Erdogan's ruling AK Party vowed on Saturday to reveal the truth about what happened to Khashoggi in his final moments. 

    Omer Celik, a spokesperson for AK Party, said Turkey was not "accusing anyone in advance, but we don't accept anything to remain covered."

    AK Party deputy head Numan Kurtulmus, said Turkey "would not abstain from sharing with the world" its own evidence. He called the case "ugly, frightening, and inhumane" and promised not to "allow a cover-up" of what really happened. 

    The US, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey are continuing their investigations into Khashoggi's death before Trump or the US Senate decide on whether to retaliate against Saudi Arabia.

    On Monday, President Trump spoke to Erdogan on the phone and agreed that "all aspects" of the explanation into Jamal Khashoggi's death needed to be "cleared up."

    SEE ALSO: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/jamal-khashoggi-fiancee-hatice-cengiz-twitter-tribute-after-death-confirmed-by-saudis-2018-10

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 7 outdoor adventures that are worth the hike


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    Elon Musk

    • Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter on Sunday that his Boring Company, which aims to lower the cost of building high-speed transit tunnels, has almost completed its first tunnel. 
    • The tunnel will open on December 10, and reportedly run under Hawthorne in the Los Angeles area.
    • Musk has previously said that his tunneling company "started out as a joke" and admitted that the project might fail.
    • The company has also touted plans to have its systems run high-speed travel between cities.  

    Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter on Sunday that his Boring Company, which aims to lower the cost of building high-speed transit tunnels, has almost completed its first tunnel. 

    The tunnel will open on December 10, Musk tweeted, and will reportedly run under Hawthorne in the Los Angeles area.

    Musk has previously said that his tunneling company "started out as a joke" and admitted that the project might fail. Musk has been relatively tight-lipped about the company's progress, and has used several publicity stunts including selling $500 flamethrowers to fund testing and development of the project.

    In May, Musk said using the future tunneling system, dubbed the Loop, would cost as little as $1 per fare. The company has also touted plans to have its systems run high-speed travel between cities. 

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Everything we know about Samsung’s foldable phone


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    Putin

    Hello! Here's what's happening on Monday.

    1. Saudi Arabia admitted that journalist Jamal Khashoggi died inside their consulate. The Saudi foreign minister denied Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had prior knowledge, but many are skeptical of the Kingdom's account.

    2. Turkey vowed to expose the "naked truth" about the events surrounding Jamal Khashoggi's death. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan also cast doubt onto Saudi Arabia's narrative on the incident.

    3. US National Security Adviser John Bolton is in Moscow for high-tension talks over plans to withdraw from a nuclear weapons treaty. President Donald Trump said Russia violated terms of the treaty, though Russia has repeatedly denied the allegations.

    4. A Chinese Uighur Muslim was denied a visa to the US despite being invited to speak at CongressKazakh national Omir Bekali has been outspoken about China’s internment camps for Muslims.

    5. Elon Musk tweeted that the Boring Company's first tunnel is set to open on December 10. Musk previously quipped that the company "started out as a joke" and acknowledged the Los Angeles tunnel project may fail.

    6. The Central American caravan has swelled to an estimated 7,000 migrants and is moving to the US border. Despite Mexico's efforts to process the migrants as refugees and halt their travel, many crossed the Guatemala-Mexico border over the weekend illegally, and decided to continue northward.

    7. Richard Parsons is resigning as interim chairman of CBS due to illnessParsons was named interim chairman in September, following the ousting of Les Moonves amid multiple sexual misconduct allegations.

    8. Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison made a national apology to child sexual abuse victims. Morrison said he wants to establish a museum that bears witness to what occurred, as well as a center for excellence to study the impact of child abuse and offer support to survivors.

    9. Gunmen killed at least 14 people in Congo as the country continues efforts to stop a deadly Ebola outbreak

    10. Defectors from SpaceX and Blue Origin are developing a remarkable technology called "Stargate" to help colonize other planets. Engineers said the goal is to start with smaller payloads and be price-competitive with SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket.

    And finally...

    One ticket, two days, 50+ insightful speakers, and 600+ executives. Business Insider’s flagship IGNITION conference headliners include Mark Cuban, Janice Min, Sir Martin Sorrell and Barbara Corcoran. Join us for IGNITION, December 3-4, New York City.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Why horseshoe crab blood is so expensive


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    caffeine vaping

    Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Monday.

    1. Twitter fired an employee in 2015 who was a suspected mole for a Saudi Arabian spying operation. The employee had reportedly been persuaded to spy on dissident accounts.
    2. Facebook reportedly wants to buy a cybersecurity company in the wake of its security breach. A deal could be announced before the end of the year.
    3. British lawmakers discovered a dark advertising campaign on Facebook, in which Brits were encouraged to lobby against Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit plan. MPs want Facebook to reveal who was behind the campaign.
    4. Facebook has hired Britain's former deputy prime minister as its global comms chief. Nick Clegg, once leader of the Liberal Democrats, has deep political ties in Europe that may help Facebook handle its scrutiny in Brussels.
    5. Phone makers will have to pay as much as $40 per device to install Google's suite of apps, according to documents obtained by The Verge. That's after Google took measures to comply with an EU antitrust ruling.
    6. Defectors from SpaceX and Blue Origin are developing a remarkable technology called 'Stargate' to help colonize other planets. Relativity Space has backing from Mark Cuban and is working on a 3D-printed rocket.
    7. Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter on Sunday that his Boring Company, which aims to lower the cost of building high-speed transit tunnels, has almost completed its first tunnelThe tunnel will open on December 10, and reportedly run under Hawthorne in the Los Angeles area.
    8. Studies are beginning to show the impact of e-cigs such as Juul on people's healthResearchers have found evidence of toxic metals like lead in e-cig vapor and evidence that vaping may be linked with an increased risk of heart attacks.
    9. Uber has hired former politico Lottie Dominiczak as its new UK communications chief. Dominiczak previously worked as a special adviser to the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.
    10. Wall Street thinks online dating may be the next hot sector, and the latest estimate sees the market growing to $12 billion by 2020. According to a note from a Nomura analyst, it all comes down to peoples' increasing willingness to try out online dating.

    Have an Amazon Alexa device? Now you can hear 10 Things in Tech each morning. Just search for "Business Insider" in your Alexa's flash briefing settings.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Watch Apple unveil a new, bigger watch


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    China Chinese Trader Shanghai Stocks

    Good morning! Here's what you need to know in markets on Monday.

    1. Chinese stocks are trading sharply higher on Monday, adding to mammoth gains achieved on Friday that were fueled by a wave of supportive measures rolled out by Chinese policymakers.After jumping 2.76% on Friday, the benchmark Shanghai Composite Index has risen by a further 4.17%, putting the index on track to record its largest two-day percentage gain since early August 2015.

    2. Foreigners sold a net 4.01 billion riyals ($1.07 billion) in Saudi stocks in the week ending October 18, exchange data showed on Sunday — one of the biggest selloffs since the market opened to direct foreign buying in mid-2015. The selloff came during a week when investors were rattled by Saudi Arabia's deteriorating relations with foreign governments following the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

    3. Over the weekend, Saudi Arabia admitted that Khashoggi died inside their consulate. The Saudi foreign minister denied Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had prior knowledge, but many are skeptical of the Kingdom's account.

    4. Turkey vowed to expose the "naked truth" about the events surrounding Jamal Khashoggi's death. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan also cast doubt onto Saudi Arabia's narrative on the incident.

    5. US National Security Adviser John Bolton is in Moscow for high-tension talks over plans to withdraw from a nuclear weapons treaty. President Donald Trump said Russia violated terms of the treaty, though Russia has repeatedly denied the allegations.

    6. Trump has no intention of de-escalating trade tensions with China, according to Axios, with the president believing instead that more time is required to make "Chinese leaders to feel more pain from his tariffs." According to Axios, one source told them that Trump "wants them to suffer more" from tariffs.

    7. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin dismissed concerns that China's weakest economic growth since the global financial crisis could spill into other emerging markets and destabilize U.S. financial markets. "I am not concerned about that destabilizing our markets," Mnuchin said in an interview with Reuters in Jerusalem at the start of a Middle East visit.

    8. BlackRock is betting on the explosive growth of exchange-traded funds, an asset class that has already propelled the firm to become the world's largest asset manager. The ETF market, which includes $4.7 trillion worldwide in assets, could jump to $12 trillion in the next five years, CEO Larry Fink said on the firm's earnings call last week.

    9. Goldman Sachs has named veteran banker Todd Leland as its investment banking head for Asia Pacific excluding Japan, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters.The move adds to leadership changes at the bank with CEO David Solomon taking over this month. Leland, an American who joined Goldman in 1992, will replace Andrea Vella and Kate Richdale who were appointed co-heads of the unit in 2015.

    10. The outlook for global growth in 2019 has dimmed for the first time, according to Reuters polls of economists who said the U.S.-China trade war and tightening financial conditions would trigger the next downturn. At the start of 2018, optimism about a robust global economic outlook was almost unanimous among respondents. But Reuters polls of more than 500 economists taken this month showed a downgrade to the outlook for 18 of 44 economies polled.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Beware one huge mistake investors often make when the economy is at a crossroads, says Charles Schwab’s investment chief


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    Tidjane Thiam, Credit Suisse CEO

    • Credit Suisse is amping up risk by offering bigger equity trades to clients. It's managing this risk through a brand new, so-called central risk desk. 
    • One notable trade in Europe this year was above $100 million, which is very large for the Swiss bank. 
    • "Punting around and crossing your fingers, that’s not what we want to do," said Mike Dilorio, head of EMEA equities at Credit Suisse. "Yes, bigger risk trades are part of that strategy, but the goal here is to provide more liquidity."

    In a cut-throat race to snag the biggest stock trades, Wall Street banks have been taking on more risk to compete. Credit Suisse had chosen to stay on the sidelines of one increasingly popular trading strategy — until now.  

    The Swiss bank in the last 12 months has introduced a so-called central risk book, or CRB, a desk where technology pools risk across dozens of traders so it can be better managed. The new CRB, rolled out this year in Europe after debuting last year in the US, is another sign that the Swiss bank has growing ambitions and is increasing the amount of risk it's taking in equities trading. 

    One notable trade on the European risk book this year was above $100 million, a person familiar with the trade said. While a $100 million trade is a large amount for a single transaction at any bank, at Credit Suisse it was especially so.

    The size of that trade was unusual enough to cause nervousness among some of the bank's traders, because of the risk that it could easily go the wrong way, the person said. By comparison, a large US investment bank might do trades that large, or even larger, every two weeks or so, separate people familiar with those trades said.

    The CRB is a big part of Credit Suisse's European equities strategy under Mike DiIorio, a managing director in the global markets division, who joined the bank from Barclays in the summer of 2017. 

    "Punting around and crossing your fingers, that’s not what we want to do," DiIorio, based in London, said in an interview. "Yes, bigger risk trades are part of that strategy, but the goal here is to provide more liquidity by facilitating more business and taking more risk on behalf of clients. We’re relatively new, and we’re going to build into that." He declined to comment on any specific trades.

    Credit Suisse's equities division has made a number of senior hires in the last 12 months, including Stuart McGuire, EMEA Head of Trading, Guy Dunning, EMEA head of sales trading, Sophie Bridge, equities COO, and Hippo Agkpo, global head of structured trading based in London.

    Getting creative

    As Wall Street firms have tussled for supremacy in stock trading, 20 years of shrinking commissions have forced them to get creative. In the early days, firms embraced electronic trading and dark pools, or used more balance sheet, to woo clients and wrest business from rivals.

    But as technology became commoditized and new rules made it more expensive to hold inventory, firms came up with ever more innovative solutions. One of those, the central risk book, is now taking hold across the industry.

    Other banks including Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Citi, Barclays, and Bank of America all have central risk desks. 

    The push at Credit Suisse comes amid the new leadership of  Mike Stewart, who joined the bank from UBS last year as the head of equities. Under Stewart, Credit Suisse is betting that as active managers look to beat benchmarks and as volatility picks up, clients will want to take large, concentrated positions in stock markets. As they do that, they'll look to the bank to shoulder the risk of sourcing and delivering a large block of stock, or take a large block of stock off their hands — thereby taking on the potential risk that the price may decline. 

    "There has been an increased need for active managers to take large positions to prove value and differentiate themselves," Stewart told Business Insider in June

    Dakin Campbell and Alex Morrell contributed to this article. 

    Also read:

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    red heart breakup

    Leaving a narcissistic relationship is likely to be one of the hardest things you'll ever do. Narcissists depend on their supply — the people they emotionally, financially, and psychologically drain. They need someone to abuse and manipulate to fulfill their needs and to constantly prove to themselves they are better, stronger, and smarter than everyone else. 

    Through the love bombing, the gaslighting, and the constant battles, you'll already be exhausted, so leaving an abusive relationship with a narcissist is tough. But it is possible as long as you trust your gut and have firm boundaries, and keep reminding yourself why you need to walk away. 

    Here's what you need to know to make sure you can get out of the potentially dangerous situation, and what to do to finally leave the abusive narcissist behind forever.

    Don't give them "one more chance."

    It takes the average person seven times to leave an abusive relationship, said doctor of psychology and therapist Perpetua Neo, who runs Detox Your Heart.

    "If you leave them, they might try and seduce you back so they can dump you," she told INSIDER. "Because everything needs to be on their terms, and if they are physically violent, there is no telling if they will be even more violent with you."

    If the narcissist isn't ready for you to leave yet, they will probably turn on the waterworks and plead with you, telling you how sorry they are. But Neo said you shouldn't risk giving them another chance to hurt you again.

    "You never know when in those seven times your nine lives will be gone," she said.



    Don't tell them you're leaving.

    You shouldn't tell the narcissist you want to end the relationship right away, according to therapist Shannon Thomas, author of "Healing from Hidden Abuse."

    "That might seem counterintuitive, but the toxic person will absolutely follow with one of two things," she said. "They will either start love bombing you to keep you emotionally trapped in the relationship through trauma bonding or their behaviors will become even more poisonous and potentially damaging to your overall wellness, physical safety or reputation. Sometimes all three."



    Make a copy of all your documents.

    This is especially important if you are from a different country, as the abuser might hide your documents so you can't escape.

    "Narcissists are very known to take your stuff away," said Neo. "So if they have your passport, track it down."

    At the very least, try to locate it, take some photos, and send them to your email. Get ahold of anything you can, including proof of address, bank details, and anything else official. Either wait until they are out, or trick them by saying you need your documents to fill out an application, Neo said.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    theresa may

    • Theresa May will on Monday reassure MPs that "95% of the Withdrawal Agreement and its protocols are now settled" amid growing threats to her leadership.
    • A fraught phone call with her Cabinet on Sunday saw ministers line up to challenge the prime minister over her handling of Brexit negotiations.
    • May appears no closer to solving the Irish backstop impasse, with MPs threatening to depose her if she makes further concessions to the European Union.
    • To make the prime minister's week even more difficult, she is facing the threat of rebellion from over 40 MPs if she does not bow to new demands over the backstop measure within the next 48 hours.

    LONDON — Theresa May will begin another dangerous week pleading with her MPs for more time to complete Brexit negotiations after Cabinet ministers revolted further against plans in a late-night phone call on Sunday.

    May will use a statement in the House of Commons on Monday afternoon to declare that "95% of the Withdrawal Agreement and its protocols are now settled," highlight new agreements covering Cyprus and Gibraltar, and insist there is now "broad agreement on the structure and scope of the future relationship."

    While the speech is likely to contain no new policy announcements, it will likely provoke suspicions among restless Brexiteers that May has made more secret concessions in Brussels to get a deal over the line.

    It could also prove to be a potentially explosive run-in with her own MPs, a growing number of whom are threatening to trigger a no-confidence vote in her leadership amid concerns her Brexit plans are undeliverable.

    The threat of rebellion stretches to her own Cabinet, with ministers thought to be unhappy about May's recent suggestion that the transition period could be extended beyond the 21 month period already agreed.

    In a long and difficult conference call on Sunday, Work & Pensions secretary Ester McVey reportedly told the prime minister she was "devastated" by the transition extension proposal, while Home Secretary Sajid Javid challenged May to use the threat of a no-deal scenario as leverage in talks. Attorney General Geoffrey Cox also raised "significant concerns" about both the backstop and extending the transition, the Telegraph reports.

    Sajid Javid

    Backstop backlash

    As well as the transition period, May will expect tough questions from MPs on the controversial "backstop" policy for preserving the frictionless Irish border no matter what the outcome of Brexit talks.

    The prime minister maintains that she will not accept the EU's preferred backstop solution of Northern Ireland effectively remaining in the EU's customs union and single market after Brexit, as this would create new checks between Northern Ireland and the rest of UK. This would enrage a lot of MPs, not least the 10 Democrat Unionist Party MPs who prop up her Conservative government and are threatening to withdraw their support.

    May's backstop counterproposal is for the UK as a whole to stay in a customs union with the EU. However, she has already reneged on a key promise she previously made to Brexiteers, telling EU leaders that whatever backstop is eventually agreed will not come with a fixed end date. Conservative MPs fear this will lead to Britain being trapped in the EU's customs territory for years to come, unable to sign new free trade deals.

    May's most recent attempt to break the deadlock — her suggestion that the UK could extend the transition period "for a few months" if the UK needed more time to solve the Irish border conundrum — was met with fury by Tory MPs, who accused May of unnecessarily delaying Brexit while preparing to hand over more money to the EU.

    MPs threaten rebellion within 48 hours

    Steve Baker

    To make the prime minister's week even more difficult, she is facing the threat of rebellion from over 40 Conservative MPs if she does not bow to new demands over the backstop within the next 48 hours, the Times reports.

    Downing Street has reportedly commissioned legal advice to determine whether May must deal with new demands from the European Research Group of Brexit-supporting MPs who are attempting to derail the backstop measure with new legislation. 

    Steve Baker, a leading ERG member, has tabled amendments to government legislation which could stop Northern Ireland being placed in a different regulatory and customs territory from Great Britain without a vote in the Northern Irish parliament in Stormont.

    The amendment will be put to a vote on Wednesday unless May backs down, with the threat of rebellion hanging over her if she refuses to.

    At stake is her leadership of the party. Support among backbenchers for her leadership has diminished even further last week amid lurid calls from MPs for the PM to "bring her own noose" to a meeting with backbench MPs on Wednesday.

    If 48 MPs submit a letter of no-confidence to Sir Graham Brady, the chairman of the 1922 backbench committee, he would be required to call a vote of no confidence, a mechanism by which the party could ultimately force a replacement in leadership. There is continuing speculation as to how many have currently been submitted.

    SEE ALSO: May faces another Brexit backlash after scrapping her time-limited backstop red line

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    Amazon warehouse

    • A top Amazon executive has said there are a lot of "myths" about poor conditions in its warehouses.
    • Head of warehouse operations John Felton told The Sunday Telegraph that he doesn't agree with the stories, many of which are "written by people that haven’t been to the buildings."
    • Felton said Amazon has become a target because of its size, but the firm is proud of its "employee experience."

    Horror stories from Amazon warehouses have been rife this year.

    Whether it's the discovery of pee in water bottles because staff feel unable to take toilet breaks, concerns over constant surveillance, or the fact that workers are suffering health problems on the job, the headlines have been grim.

    But Amazon thinks many of the concerns have been fabricated. That's according to head of warehouse operations, John Felton, who was interviewed by The Sunday Telegraph.

    "There is a lot of negative press out there, on working conditions, on pay, on safety," he told the newspaper. "For the most part, I don’t agree with any of it. Much of it is written by people that haven’t been to the buildings. A lot of it is myths out there, not reality."

    Many of this year's stories were sparked by undercover journalist James Bloodworth, who spent just under a month in 2016 working as a "picker" at an Amazon fulfillment center in Rugeley, central England. It was Bloodworth who discovered the bottle of urine, and compared working conditions to like being in a prison.

    Business Insider has also spoken directly to Amazon warehouse staff across the world. Some echoed Bloodworth's experiences in describing the intense pressure of working in a fulfillment center, where they pick and pack items for delivery.

    Felton said Amazon is a target for negative press. "We’re a big company and I think that means that we are a target. As a big company, one of our responsibilities is to accept scrutiny," he explained, adding that the firm has a "great employee experience we're really proud of."

    Amazon has fought back against reporting on working conditions. It has recruited a small army of people to tweet nice things about working in fulfillment centers, while it has also raised the minimum wage for staff in the US and Britain.

    Join the conversation about this story »

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    jack dorsey twitter ceo square

    • Twitter fired an engineer in 2015 after intelligence officials alerted the company to the fact that he might be a mole working for Saudi Arabia, The New York Times reports.
    • Ali Alzabarah was reportedly hired in 2013 and subsequently groomed by Saudi intelligence operatives to spy on dissident accounts.
    • Twitter could not find evidence that Alzabarah sent user data to the Saudi government, but fired him in December 2015.

    Twitter fired an engineer after the company was tipped off by intelligence officials that he may have been groomed by the Saudi government, The New York Times reports.

    In a report which claimed that a troll army working for Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman harassed dissidents like murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the Times said Twitter was told about a potential mole on its books at the end of 2015.

    Ali Alzabarah joined Twitter in 2013 and rose to an engineering post that gave him access to user details such as phone numbers and IP addresses, the Times reports.

    Citing three people briefed on the matter, the newspaper said Western intelligence officials told Twitter that Alzabarah had become closer with Saudi intelligence operatives who convinced him to snoop on several accounts.

    Twitter placed Alzabarah on administrative leave while it conducted an investigation and questioned him. The company reportedly found no evidence that Alzabarah gave data to the Saudi government, but still fired him in December 2015.

    Twitter sent emails to the owners of "a few dozen" accounts accessed by Alzabarah, saying: "As a precaution, we are alerting you that your Twitter account is one of a small group of accounts that may have been targeted by state-sponsored actors."

    The accounts belonged to security and privacy researchers, surveillance specialists, policy academics, and journalists, according to the Times. Some of those targeted worked for the Tor project, a nonprofit organisation which helps people defend their privacy online.

    Twitter declined to comment when contacted by Business Insider. The Saudi Arabian embassy did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

    Alzabarah did not respond to the Times' requests for comment. He returned to Saudi Arabia where he now works for the government, the newspaper said.

    SEE ALSO: Jamal Khashoggi's fiancée wrote a touching tribute for him on Twitter hours after Saudi authorities confirmed his death

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    Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex during the JLR Drive Day at Cockatoo Island on October 20, 2018 in Sydney, Australia.

    • Prince Harry is hoping for a baby girl, he told fans on Sunday.
    • The royal was attending an Invictus Games event, held in Australia this year, when a member of the crowd yelled out "Congratulations! I hope it's a girl."
    • In a video posted on Twitter, the prince can be heard replying, "So do I!"
    • Harry's wife Meghan Markle the Duchess of Sussex is around four months pregnant.
    • Kensington Palace announced at the weekend that the duchess' schedule would be cut down to allow her time to rest during the couple's whirlwind 16-day royal tour.
    • As well as Australia, Harry and Meghan are set to visit Fiji, Tonga, and New Zealand in the coming weeks.

    Prince Harry has revealed what gender he is hoping his new baby with Meghan Markle will be.

    The royal told Australian fans at the Invictus Games on Sunday that he is hoping for a baby girl.

    Harry was attending a cycling event when a member of the audience yelled out, "Congratulations! I hope it's a girl."

    In a video posted on Twitter, the prince can be heard replying, "So do I!"

    Harry attended a number of events by himself at the weekend as it is understood that Meghan, who is around four months pregnant, has been struggling with the hectic schedule of the tour and took some time to rest.

    The duke and duchess, who kicked off their 16-day autumn royal tour in Australia last Tuesday, are set to visit cities in Fiji, Tonga, and New Zealand in the coming weeks.

    According to Sky News, Kensington Palace announced on Sunday that the duchess' schedule would be cut back slightly.

    The palace said in a statement: "After a busy programme, the duke and duchess have decided to cut back the duchess's schedule slightly for the next couple of days, ahead of the final week-and-a-half of the tour."

    A source in the royal household told Sky News: "She wants to do everything, but Prince Harry is encouraging her to pace herself."

    Created by Prince Harry, the Invictus Games is an international sporting event for wounded and recovering veterans and active service people and have been held annually since 2014. This year's event began on Saturday and ends with a closing ceremony on October 27.

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    facebook ceo mark zuckerberg

    • Facebook is looking to acquire a major cybersecurity company, The Information reports.
    • The tech firm has reportedly assembled a team to scout out big cybersecurity firms to add to its technical expertise and to quell criticism of its data protection.
    • It comes a few weeks after Facebook disclosed it had detected the biggest data breach in its history, which affected 30 million users.

    Facebook is shopping around for a big cybersecurity company, The Information reports.

    Citing four people familiar with the matter, The Information said Facebook has approached a number of cybersecurity companies with a view to a possible acquisition.

    Sources declined to say which companies had been approached, but one said a deal could be closed as soon as the end of this year.

    Facebook has reportedly assembled a team to scout out targets with a view to bolstering its cybersecurity expertise and to quell public criticism of its data protection.

    Facebook has faced a barrage of criticism due to a few high-level scandals. Last month it disclosed that it had detected the biggest data breach in its history which affected some 30 million users. Facebook stated in October that it believed spammers, not state-sponsored agents, were behind the hack.

    The Cambridge Analytica data-scraping scandal also exposed Facebook to scrutiny over how well it protects the data of its users.

    Business Insider has contacted Facebook for comment.

    SEE ALSO: The huge hack affecting 30 million people came at the worst possible time for Facebook

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    Marketplace return

    • Walmart has partnered with "hundreds" of its third-party marketplace sellers to offer free two-day shipping on "millions more" items on Walmart.com. The shipping offer applies to orders over $35.
    • These items join a selection of items that Walmart sells directly to customers, which also have free two-day shipping for orders over $35.
    • Walmart is also simplifying the returns process for items sold by these sellers.

    Walmart is beefing up its online offerings with a little help from its friends.

    The company announced on Tuesday that it has partnered with "hundreds" of its top sellers on Walmart.com's third-party marketplace to offer free two-day shipping.

    That will result in "millions more" items on Walmart.com being eligible for the perk, which is available on eligible orders over $35, according to the company. The free tw0-day shipping eligibility for these items will start rolling out in November.

    As long as a product is marked eligible for free two-day shipping, it doesn't matter who is selling it — customers still get the perk. For example, if a customer has two items in a cart that equal $35, as long as they're both eligible for two-day shipping, it doesn't matter whether the order is coming from a seller or directly from Walmart.

    Walmart has also improved the return policy for these select sellers. Starting soon, Walmart will simplify returns, allowing customers to print return slips from its website to attach to boxes and send back to sellers.

    Starting in mid-November, Walmart will also send the package on behalf of customers if they bring it to any of Walmart's stores in the United States. All they have to do is bring it to the Services desk fully packaged for return.

    In both cases, return fees will vary depending on the items and the seller.

    Adding more functionality to Walmart's third-party marketplace enables a more seamless shopping experience for customers to shop and not worry about where each item is being shipped from. 

    It mirrors Amazon's Fulfillment by Amazon and Prime Onsite initatives, which ships sellers packages and certifies third-party warehouses to ship Prime packages, respectively. 

    Walmart's new program doesn't take the shipping in-house, but it does offer something that Amazon's online-only operation can't match: a network of 4,700 stores that can serve as a dropoff point. 

    SEE ALSO: 12 devices and services that could help you ditch Amazon completely

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    Donald Trump

    • In the days following Saudi Arabia's admission that journalist Jamal Khashoggi died inside its consulate building in Istanbul, Turkey, US President Donald Trump has agreed there are holes in the Kingdom’s latest explanation.
    • Riyadh confirmed Khashoggi's death on Saturday, saying he died during a physical altercation with Saudi agents inside the consulate.
    • But after more than two weeks of stonewalling, that explanation has been widely panned and the concession failed to stem a massive sell off in Saudi stocks last week.
    • That has not stopped Trump from launching a perplexing defense of the House of Saud by vastly inflating the number of US jobs at stake, should the US abandon an arms deal with Saudi Arabia.
    • Trump has claimed that the Saudi arms deals will be the engine behind a million US jobs, an increase of 955,000 jobs in a handful of days.

    In the days following Saudi Arabia's admission that journalist Jamal Khashoggi died inside its consulate building in Istanbul, Turkey, US President Donald Trump has agreed there are holes in the Kingdom’s latest explanation.

    Riyadh confirmed Khashoggi's death on Saturday, saying he died during a physical altercation with Saudi agents inside the consulate.

    But after more than two weeks of stonewalling, that explanation has been widely panned and the concession failed to stem a massive sell off in Saudi stocks last week. Also, that has not stopped Trump from launching a perplexing defense of the Saudis by vastly inflating the number of US jobs at stake if the US abandons an arms deal with Saudi Arabia.

    On March 20, the day after Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman arrived in Washington for his second sit down with Trump, the president claimed the Saudi arms deals helped create 40,000 new US jobs.

    That figure began to go nova on October 13, when Trump declared from the White House, "I worked hard to get the order for the military, $110 billion," Trump said. "I believe it's (the) largest order ever made. It's 450,000 jobs,” Trump claimed.

    That number jumped to 500,000 in an interview Trump gave to Fox Business on October 17. And then hardly 48 hours later, after ABC News claimed the Turkish government let Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listen to audio allegedly detailing when and how Khashoggi was killed, the same deals started generating 600,000 jobs.

    The following evening, October 17, the president said Saudi arms sales were behind “over a million jobs.” The details of the $110 billion arms package — initiated under the Obama administration and agreed upon in May 2017 — have also been “sketchy,” according to the Associated Press.

    The Pentagon has said Saudi Arabia signed “letters of offer and acceptance” for only $14.5 billion in military sales.

    The implication is that the vast majority of the package remains in the air, a significant slice of money the administration is doing its best not to place at risk.

    Trump has so far proven unwilling to strongly condemn the events surrounding Khashoggi’s disappearance and death that he has turned a deaf ear to his own intelligence officials, prompting The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin to say his administration has become “an accessory after the fact, an enabler of nearly unimaginable evil."

    For now, the US, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey are continuing their investigations into Khashoggi's death before Trump or the US Senate decide on any retaliatory measures against the Kingdom.

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